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  • one.

    WHAT MAKES YOU LAUGH HYSTERICALLY?

    “When I'm at home, I'm no one. The real stars here are Nazareth, you remember the ones with that terrible cover of "Love Hurts"? Well, they're playing on our football stadium (in England called pitch) in a couple of weeks, described as "the largest cultural happening in Senja in decades". I will never reach them to the ankles, and that indeed makes me laugh hysterically”
  • two.

    HOW HARD DO YOU PARTY?

  • three.

    WHAT DOES YOUR MUSIC LOOK LIKE?

  • four.

    WHAT DO YOU LOVE THE MOST ABOUT WHERE YOU LIVE?

    “Driving home, through snow and rain in May, knowing that the only warmth you'll find has to be of the human sort”
  • five.

    TAKE A REALLY COLOURFUL PHOTO

    “It is still early spring here, May 26th. After three and a half hours of walking, this was the most colourful piece of creation that I could find. In a couple of weeks, it's all going to change”
  • six.

    WHAT CONFUSES YOU THE MOST?

    “That people are actually able to translate this into audible sounds (and that they got the idea in the first place)”
  • seven.

    PHOTOGRAPH SOME NAKEDNESS OR SOMETHING ILLEGAL

    “This is both: my bare feet on someone elses pier (and I didn't ask for permission to go there)”
  • eight.

    WHAT MAKES YOU REALLY ANGRY?

    “The fact that when someone dies here, some rich ass from some city buys the house as a summer hideout, making it impossible for the youths to find a home here, and leaving the village dead from August to June. This guy even built a new one (I bet I'll never find out his name, much less meet him)”
  • nine.

    WHAT PUZZLES YOU ABOUT DECAY?

  • ten.

    TELL US A SECRET

    “Ah, houses! We once broke into this, as kids, to form our own little youth club, and after having found the largest teddy bear my eyes have ever seen in one of the rooms, we realised that life was much cooler clubless and patternless, so we left. No one has ever lived there since, either”
  • related

Interview With Moddi

WARM, WARM WARMTH FROM THE FAR, FAR NORTH

Interview With Moddi

WARM, WARM WARMTH FROM THE FAR, FAR NORTH

Pål Moddi Knutsen – also known as Moddi - is a Norwegian musician from Senja. With his mother’s accordion, a stolen Russian display mandolin and his own well-worn blue guitar, Moddi makes music that has a life of its own. Sometimes it feels like a huge band session, full of noise and loud passion; at other times it can be so small, quiet, and discrete that you might feel the need to sing along to help it continue. Moddi is good, good people, the type of which the music industry – and indeed the world – needs more of. This is illustrated perfectly in the accompanying notes which came back with these photos and are more detailed than any we’ve previously received:

“Thank you for that beautiful photo task you gave me. I’ve finally returned home, where I have some time to do things that are not shouting at me. It’s been raining here for five days now, and the place is desolate and, well, the photos are probably pretty influenced by that. It’s all home, and it’s all my mobile camera (I was thinking of doing it analogue but it’s too far to the nearest town, so I couldn’t get them exposed). Anyway, I had to remove question nine, “find something to steal”, as there is nothing to steal over here. I could have taken something from the neighbour, but that would be a “permanent loan” and if I stole something from the store here, it would be “credit”, so I wasn’t really able to steal anything.”

Floriography is Moddi’s first full-length studio communiqué and his first album to be released outside Norway. Back in his home nation, Moddi is a critical success having garnered two Norwegian Grammy nominations (Best Male and Best Newcomer in case you were wondering) for his pseudo-acoustic fare. Floriography is an emotionally wrought debut album which rallies unguarded emotions against tranquillity, and is arguably his biggest triumph thus far.

To accompany these lush photos of the far North we’re giving away an MP3 of Magpie Eggs – a track on which Moddi’s coarsely accented voice enchants, writhing in time with the tortured grace of a stabbing string section. Please also read the quotes attached to the photos because they are well, well worth it. Takk.