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    WHAT DO YOU LOVE THE MOST ABOUT WHERE YOU LIVE?

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    DESTROY SOMETHING

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Interview With Grass House

ATMOSPHERIC EERINESS, MACABRE SPOKEN MELODRAMA AND DARK-HEARTED MALEVOLENCE

Interview With Grass House

ATMOSPHERIC EERINESS, MACABRE SPOKEN MELODRAMA AND DARK-HEARTED MALEVOLENCE

Londoners Grass House have an off-the-wall collection of songs which are rich in imagery and immediately compelling, yet simultaneously as caustic and unwelcoming as a drunk paedophile in a busy playground. If you like the atmospheric eeriness of Interpol, the macabre spoken melodrama of Nick Cave, and the dark-hearted malevolence of Lord Auch, then you’ll be right at home sitting in the shadows, smoking trendy foreign snouts and lopping the ears off small woodland mammals with a rusty razorblade to Grass House.

Their current EP (Plough More Sky) is a sinister and twisted breeding ground of tangible tenseness, whose resonant melodies have been organically nurtured, haphazardly sprinkled with esoteric ambition, peppered with oddball lyrics (check out this ACE free MP3 – Snowcones – to see what I mean) and lovingly encouraged to grow with just a hint of pretension. With doomy and cynical declarations of futility and mortality, there is a danger that Grass House could easily be kicked to the kerb and pigeonholed as another ‘gloomcore’ bore, however, there is a certain tongue-in-cheek, darkly ironic humour to everything that they do and this covertly spills over into their melodic funeral waltzes and results in that certain glowing comfort that can sometimes only be found in uncomfortableness. Check them out if you don’t believe me. Though by now you really should.

With influences as diverse as Jacques Brel and Captain Beefheart it’s no wonder that Grass House sound so ominous and existential, like a cyclonic, cathartic, cleansing plague. With the new global depression crying out for a fitting soundtrack, I think we may have found a contender to write it. Or at the very least someone to play a confusingly, plinkety-plonk slice of noircore melody when the fuse is lit and this shoddy rock finally shifts some serious axis and leaves this god-forsaken orbit for an altogether less tetchy place.